On Voting Early in a Late Market

This is another post submitted by my mother, Libagrouchy. Many of the elderly I have spoken with -- on the phones or standing on their front porch -- have indeed come across as mildewing fruit, their generation's biases and prejudices fermented into a product that no one is buying anymore. Avoid the lines; early voting in Texas runs through Friday, 7 AM - 7 PM.

Austinites who haven't yet done their civic duty should consider early voting at the Fiesta Market at 38th Street/I-35. There's no better way to renew one's faith in the virtues of the melting pot that is our country than to run the Fiesta entryway gauntlet of Andean panpipes, Mexican imports, helados, and general world market atmosphere en route to casting one's vote in this election.
Particularly in light of the last-minute flare-up of b.s. surrounding who is and isn't "pro-American," Fiesta's polyglot customer base and bustling vitality are nothing less than restorative. At Fiesta, moms and daughters in headscarves, men in cowboy boots, women in saris, and whole generations of immigrant families are pushing carts through aisles that are little microcosms of international cuisine. Here, food is the battleground, not politics or religion. As far as I know, no one has come to blows over mangos at 3 for a dollar. In fact, given its status as a staple of Hispanic, Asian, and Indian cooking, the mango has a heftier international portfolio than Sarah Palin and might well qualify as a U.N. diplomat in a potential McCain administration.
Wedged in between the customer courtesy desk and a steam table loaded with chorizo sausage is the early voting station. Feeling giddy, I handed over my registration card saying, "I feel REALLy good about this one. Bring it on!" The 80-ish, silver-haired volunteer was not having any of that. She was irritable and short with me. Perhaps she was just tired after a long day of explaining to citizens that the the electronic voting machine "is NOT a touch screen; you have to TURN the wheel."
Or maybe, in the midst of the cultural diversity swirling around her, this woman felt outnumbered, disoriented, and threatened. It's possible she realized that, like the late-season peaches moldering on a nearby counter, her party had passed its sell-by date quite a while ago and was drawing only flies, and not many of them at that.
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3 Response to "On Voting Early in a Late Market"

  • rvac106 Says:

    Mom's are awesome. Well, at least yours is. We voted early at the Ben-Hur Shrine in North Austin, on Saturday, across the street from Sun-Harvest, and the Oreck Store. It was surprisingly crowded, and the tables were manned (or womanned) by an eclectic combination of 'older' men and women, who seemed to be having a really good time. And, the place was packed. At one point, there was actually a line waiting to get at that pesky wheel. Now, the only problem is, we have no interest in watching all the political ads on tv. We've been there, done that, and got the sticker. But that's not why I looked up Mean Rachel today. Today, I've found another cool video for your consideration. Barack Obama, on stage, with Carolyn Wonderland, Joe Ely, and Asleep at the Wheel. Classic. Enjoy.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ti3usmrqN4

    Robert


  • kurt Says:

    Mango = UN diplomat?

    GENIUS! Thanks for the laugh.


  • MRhé Says:

    "In fact, given its status as a staple of Hispanic, Asian, and Indian cooking, the mango has a heftier international portfolio than Sarah Palin and might well qualify as a U.N. diplomat in a potential McCain administration."

    Perhaps the greatest political commentary of the campaign!

    I think Libagrouchy needs to become a regular contributor.